BBC Media Action Lifeline Programming - online course for engaging with your audience

Audience EngagementEngaging your audience in a two way conversation during regular programming is vital for good radio.  It becomes essential when your listeners are in the midst of a humanitarian crisis, or you are a journalist travelling to a crisis zone.

This BBC Media Action free, online ‘Lifeline Programming’ course shows journalists and editors how media can best help their listeners and viewers during a humanitarian crisis.  The 45 minute course – narrated by Lyse Doucet, the BBC’s chief international correspondent – includes interactive modules on ‘communicating during crises’, ‘connecting with audiences’ and ‘working with the humanitarian sector’.

UNESCO World Radio Day 2017 partner, BBC Media Action offers a free, online Lifeline Programming course on their website.

"We developed the Lifeline course to prepare journalists to meet the needs of audiences in the midst of an emergency." Jackie Dalton, Lifeline Programming specialist:

 

This free, online ‘Lifeline Programming’ course shows journalists and editors how media can best help their listeners and viewers during a humanitarian crisis.

The 45 minute course – narrated by Lyse Doucet, the BBC’s chief international correspondent – includes interactive modules on ‘communicating during crises’, ‘connecting with audiences’ and ‘working with the humanitarian sector’.

The aim of Lifeline Programming is to alleviate people's suffering and assist with their recovery. It provides timely, relevant and practical information on subjects ranging from food water and shelter to medical care and psychological support.

Affected people are also given the opportunity to voice their concerns, express their needs, share their stories and solutions and hold humanitarian aid providers to account.

The initiative is used during disasters across the world – most recently in Nepal – where an emergency Lifeline programme was set up within hours of the country’s 2015 earthquake.

Jackie Dalton, BBC Media Action’s Lifeline Programming specialist says, “We developed the Lifeline course to prepare journalists to meet the needs of audiences in the midst of an emergency. The course encourages journalists to think differently about disaster coverage by helping them produce content for the affected population, as well as about them.”

You can download the free PDF resource here.

The Lifeline course is funded by the UK’s Department for International Development. This content is provided by BBC Media Action.

 

 

 


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